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Mathematics (MATH)


MATH 1000 - Problem Solving Strategies in Mathematics - 3 credits

Fall and Spring Semesters

This course introduces students to the processes by which mathematicians define, approach, present, and critique solutions to real-world problems. The focus is on using deductive and logical reasoning to solve problems.

This course does not satisfy the General Education First Year Core Quantitative Literacy requirement.

Prerequisites: Math Assessment Performance or permission of instructor.


MATH 1142 - Statistics Problem Solving Recitation - 1 credit

Fall Semester

This course can be taken concurrently with a standard Statistics I course to provide an additional 1-credit of supplemental instruction. In the recitation, students are supported as they explore the collection, organization, analysis, and inference of data in multiple contexts through statistical methods.

Prerequisite: Qualifying score on the Mathematics Placement Assessment.

Corequisite: MATH 1150.


MATH 1150 Statistics I - 3 credits

Fall and Spring Semesters

Explores the collection, organization, analysis, and inference of data in multiple contexts through statistical methods. Requires students to discuss quantitative results, interpret multiple representations (symbolic, graphical, numerical, verbal) of quantitative information, and solve problems using quantitative methods, particularly linear regression and correlation, the construction of confidence intervals, and tests of hypotheses.

This course meets the General Education First Year Core Quantitative Literacy requirement.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of MATH 1000 or demonstrated proficiency on the Mathematics Assessment.


MATH 1190 - College Algebra - 3 credits

Fall and Spring Semesters

This is a mathematical preparation for management, science, social science, and psychology. Emphasis on developing problems and solutions: mathematical modeling. Algebra concepts will be extended to graphs, percentages, and setting up and solving equations (linear and quadratic). Introduction to functions: polynomial, logarithmic and exponential. Applications include rate, time and distance problems, interest , cost analysis, demand and supply, and growth and decay processes.

Not available to students who have completed MATH 2140.

This course meets the General Education First Year Core Quantitative Literacy requirement.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of MATH 1000 or demonstrated proficiency on the Mathematics Assessment.


MATH 1550 - Quantification in School Mathematics - 3 credits

Spring Semester

This course engages students in analyzing the structure of school mathematics, particularly the domain of numbers and numeration and measurement. Students explore systems of numeration, properties of number systems, and the conceptual underpinnings of arithmetic and computation from an advanced perspective. The development of problem-solving strategies and the clear communication of mathematical ideas are emphasized throughout the course. Students are challenged to present mathematics content in a variety of ways, particularly through scaffolding conceptual development from concrete to abstract representations. This course provides a college-level treatment of content areas of interest to prospective educators and to others interested in a survey of modern mathematical ideas. This course is required for Early Childhood Education, Special Education and Elementary Education majors.

This course meets the General Education First Year Core Quantitative Literacy requirement.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of MATH 1000 or demonstrated proficiency on the Mathematics Assessment.


MATH 2130 - Calculus I - 3 credits

Fall Semester

Introduction to differential and integral calculus, stressing applications of calculus to significant classes of real-world situations, with examples from the natural, social, and behavioral sciences.

This course meets the General Education First Year Core Quantitative Literacy requirement.

Prerequisite: MATH 1190, or equivalent background.


MATH 2140 - Calculus II - 3 credits

Spring Semester

Continuation of MATH 2130. Includes transcendental functions, applications of integration, probability density functions, Taylor’s series, and differential equations.

Prerequisite: MATH 2130.


MATH 2150 - Statistics II - 3 credits

This is a course in statistical inference that continues the study of estimation and hypothesis testing introduced in Statistics I. Topics include inference for means and proportions, one- and two-way tables for categorical data, analysis of variance, inference for simple regression and correlation, and an introduction to multiple regression.

Prerequisite: MATH 1150.


MATH 2160- Discrete Mathematics - 3 credits

Offered periodically within a three-year academic cycle

This course explores widely applicable mathematical tools for computer and information science, including topics from logic, set theory, combinatorics, number theory, probability theory, and graph theory. It includes opportunities for students to practice reasoning formally and proving theorems.

Prerequisite: Completion of General Education Quantitative Literacy core course.


MATH 2200 - History of Mathematical Inquiry - 3 credits

Offered periodically within a three-year academic cycle

The domains and structure of modern mathematics were generated over the course of many centuries and through a variety of cultures. The development of mathematics occurred alongside the development of physics and astronomy, and provides inspiration to students of different disciplines. This course surveys major mathematical developments beginning with the accomplishments of the ancient Egyptians and continues up to the 17th century, when the basis of modern Calculus was set. This course considers how these developments have been influenced by the cultures and needs of different civilizations.

This course meets the General Education International/Global Interdependence requirement.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of MATH 1000 or demonstrated proficiency on the Mathematics Assessment.


MATH 2300 - Foundations of Proof - 3 credits

Offered periodically within a three-year academic cycle

This course introduces students to the foundational skills and techniques in mathematical proof. There will be significant discussion centered around “the proving process,” regarding both its technical and creative aspects. Topics include rules of reasoning, deductive proof methods, and induction.

Prerequisite: MATH 1190 or MATH 2130 or permission of instructor.


MATH 2550 - Number Theory and Relationships for Teachers - 3 credits

Fall Semester

This course builds and elaborates upon basic concepts introduced in MATH 1550. Topics include number theory, functions and algebra. The course focuses upon investigation and problem solving and involves the use of relevant manipulatives and technology. Emphasized are clear communication of mathematical ideas and an understanding of the connectedness of these ideas within and between mathematical concepts. This course is designed primarily for students preparing to teach elementary and middle school or work with children.

Prerequisite: MATH 1550.


MATH 2900 - Independent Research in Mathematics Education - 1-3 credits

Individual, independent research on selected topics in mathematics education.

Prerequisite: Students must have at least a 3.0 average in the subject area in which they seek to work and at least a 2.7 cumulative average, and Instructor Permission.


MATH 3120 - Calculus III - 3 credits

Offered periodically within a three-year academic cycle

This course is an introduction to the calculus of functions of several variables. It begins with studying the basic objects of multidimensional geometry: vectors and vector operations, lines, planes, cylinders, quadric surfaces, and various coordinate systems. It continues with the elementary differential geometry of vector functions and space curves. After this, it extends the basic tools of differential calculus – limits, continuity, derivatives, linearization, and optimization – to multidimensional problems. The course will conclude with a study of integration in higher dimensions, culminating in a multidimensional version of the substitution rule.

Prerequisite: MATH 2140.


MATH 3130 - Operations Research - 3 credits

Offered periodically within a three-year academic cycle

Optimization of linear functions: linear programming, simplex method, transportation, and network problems. Optimization of non-linear functions: unconstrained optima, constrained optima and Lagrange multipliers, Kuhn-Tucker conditions, calculus of variations, and simulations. Poisson processes, Markov chains, and queuing theory are covered at the end of the semester.

Prerequisite: MATH 2130.


MATH 3150 - Statistics III - 3 credits

Spring Semester

This course builds upon topics covered in Statistics II, particularly multiple regression and analysis of variance, and completes the transition to the use of statistical software for data analysis. Topics in multiple regressions will include polynomial regression, the use of dummy variables, model building, and variable screening methods. Two-way ANOVA and the design of experiments will be covered, and topic(s) will be selected from the following: logistic regression, time series modeling, and nonparametric tests.

Prerequisite: MATH 2150.


MATH 3175 - Modern Algebra - 3 credits

Offered periodically within a three-year academic cycle

This course is an introduction to algebraic systems, definitions, and basic properties. There is an emphasis on group theory and a brief survey of rings, fields, and polynomial rings over a field.

Prerequisite: Any 2000-level MATH course. Students are encouraged to take MATH 2300 first.


MATH 3200 - Mathematical Modeling - 3 credits

Offered periodically within a three-year academic cycle

The focus of this course is on mathematical modeling using graphical, numerical, symbolic, and verbal techniques to describe and explore real-world data and phenomena. The main goal of the course is to introduce students to both deterministic and probabilistic techniques useful in the mathematical description of physical events and situations. The main topics will be regression analysis, dimensional analysis, modeling with ordinary differential equations, and discrete and continuous methods of probabilistic modeling. Emphasis is on the use of models to investigate and analyze applied problems and questions, supported by the use of appropriate technology, and on effective communication of quantitative concepts and results.

Prerequisite: MATH 1150, experience with calculus concepts is recommended.


MATH 3250 - Pedagogy and Specialized Instruction in Mathematics - 3 credits

Spring Semester

This course emphasizes the factors that contribute to creating effective learning environments for increasing conceptual development in mathematics. Using content in geometry, measurement, probability, data analysis, and statistics as illustrative examples, students will design a unit of study that is developmentally appropriate for the population of students with whom they intend to work. Students will be charged with broadening and deepening their own college-level understanding of the content in an effort to both utilize data for instructional decision-making and to identify the structure and relationships between ideas that they will communicate to students. In addition, effective instructional methods, formative and summative assessment techniques, and intervention strategies will be explored. (Same course as ED 3250).

This course meets the General Education Social Science Breadth and Quantitative Literacy Enhancement requirements.

Prerequisites: MATH 1550, MATH 2550.